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[caption id="attachment_43364" align="alignright" width="315" caption="WholeVine flours are made from (clockwise from top) zinfandel seeds, chardonnay seeds, pinot noir skins, sauvignon blanc skins and syrah skins."][/caption]SANTA ROSA -- Barbara Banke, chairwoman of Jackson Family Wines, and Chalk Hill Winery co-founder Peggy Furth are launching WholeVine, intended to eventually become a charitable business developing products from as many of the parts of vine as possible with quality as premium as the winegrapes.Rather than a "waste stream" created by vine management or crushpad operations, WholeVine is turning turn seeds, skins, leaves, canes and other vine parts into high-end products such as culinary oils and gluten-free artisan flours with varietal flavor, premium fiber paper, cosmetics and natural food coloring."As we looked at our wine companies, we were talking about the total annual production of a grapevine and how to find value in what we throw away," Ms. Furth said.The venture has been in the works for two years, testing product possibilities with help from several food scientists from Jackson Family Wines and the University of California, Davis, and artisan foods experts.The key is recovering the seeds and skins from the pomace as quickly as possible after it comes from the grape press, according to Ms. Furth. Jackson technical services director and WholeVine consultant Torey Arvik found that the seeds can start molding significantly within 24 hours. That's why grapeseed oil producers in Europe use highly process seeds recovered from pomace bound for compost, removing much of the grape flavor.After testing the concept with pinot noir skins and seeds in the 2009 harvest and eight varieties in the 2010 harvest, WholeVine has set up a 17,000-square-foot production and development facility near Charles M. Schulz--Sonoma County Airport and lined up Certified Foods of Woodland to mill certified gluten-free flour. Currently sourced from Jackson's Vinwood winery, all the company's coastal wineries produce 4 million pounds of seeds annually. The new facility will dry and prepare 200,000 pounds of seeds this year and is has seed driers to handle 500,000 pounds.The first products to market will be 16 variations of gluten-free, high-protein, high-fiber flours milled from the seeds or skins of five winegrape varieties -- syrah, zinfandel, sauvignon blanc, chardonnay and pinot noir -- a line of cookies made from four of those flours; and eight varietal culinary oils. The target market for the flours is commercial bakers. Six Northern California stores are set to carry the cookies early next year.WholeVine oils and flours aren't cheap. The 375-milliliter bottles of oil retail for $25, and the suggested retail price for the flours is $6.50 per half-pound.However, a little of these flours and oils goes a long way, according to WholeVine General Manager Paul Novak. Bakers can mix 5 percent to 10 percent of these flours with conventional flour and still provide crusty or chewy texture, a nutritional boost (antioxidants, iron and potassium) and and varietal characteristics. Grapeseed flour can contain 15 percent protein and 30 percent to 50 percent fiber.The same goes for the oils. At that price, they are being marketed for dipping bread or drizzling on salads, rather than for frying, as grapeseed oil is commonly used because it burns at higher temperatures. And chefs who have been trying out the oils have found flavor intensity can warrant blending with cooking oils, Mr. Novak said.Amid the challenging economy of the past two years, Ms. Banke and Ms. Furth have been looking for fund-raising opportunities for the Sonoma Paradiso Foundation they started. If they are successful in creating premium markets for these goods, they want a "significant portion" of the proceeds to go to charitable efforts, likely the local children's organizations Ms. Banke and Ms. Furth help, analogous to actor Paul Newman's philanthropic Newman's Own company, according to Mr. Novak, a wine marketing expert who has been advising Jackson.Building those profits will be the challenge."We're creating a series of new categories, so it will be a bit difficult," he said. "We're having to teach people how to use these flours and oils. I have to say to people, 'What you know about grapeseed oil is wrong.'"WholeVine plans to demonstrate its first products Thursday at a private launch party in Santa Rosa.Shawn Johnson of Keegan & Coppin represented Sonomaceuticals LLC, dba WholeVine, in the July sublease at 3250 Brickway Blvd. He also represented sublessor SMC Ltd., which acquired Stoesser-Gordon Plastics in 2008.