Healdsburg hospital sees high demand for wound care

Hyperbaric chambers new for region; ‘real joy in seeing patients cured’

[caption id="attachment_25238" align="alignright" width="326" caption="The chambers contain 100 percent oxygen, which helps white blood cells fend off infections while producing more collagen, according to Daniel Rose, medical director of the wound care program."][/caption]

HEALDSBURG – A new level of wound care is being provided by Healdsburg District Hospital, one that previously was unavailable anywhere in the North Bay and one that could help the hospital carve out a niche as it seeks to identify both health care needs and sustainable new business ventures.

In July, the hospital announced the opening of its Northern California Wound Care facility on Healdsburg Avenue. The facility goes well beyond the traditional level of care, offering hyperbaric therapy for hard-to-heal wounds such as diabetic ulcers and radiation injury.

The next closest hyperbaric care facilities are in San Francisco, and the hospital’s two chambers are already at full capacity, indicating a strong need, said Evan Rayner, chief executive officer of the North Sonoma County Healthcare District.

“We know that there is a significant need for this type of comprehensive wound care,” Mr. Rayner said, adding that it’s augmented with traditional treatments. “We try to look at services that aren’t provided in the community, and we also want to have a good business program. This one has a business return on our investment that we like to have in some of our business models.”

Patients utilizing the hyperbaric treatment are placed into a chamber that has an absolute atmospheric pressure of two or three. The pressure at absolute two is equal to the level of pressure at sea level; at absolute three, the pressure is equal to 3,000 feet above sea level. The chambers contain 100 percent oxygen, which helps white blood cells fend off infections while producing more collagen, according to Daniel Rose, medical director of the wound care program.

There are two chambers in Healdsburg, each valued at approximately $250,000, Dr. Rose said.

While the care is both unique and effective in staving off sores or even amputation, it is also covered by Medicare and most insurers, which provides for an economic benefit for the hospital, Mr. Rayner said.

The Healdsburg wound center does not see patients for seven of 15 Medicare indications, due to the acuteness of some illnesses and because it is an outpatient center. Some illnesses not treated include acute carbon monoxide, gas embolism or gas gangrene, among others.


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